Order of Worship, 9.10.17

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Order of Worship

Simpson Scholarship Report

Property Ctte Report

Hospitality Report

 

Friends Meeting of Washington

Order of Worship

Monthly Meeting for Worship with a Concern for Business

September 10, 2017

 

Query for Worship Sharing: How do we live our testimonies of peace and community in times of turmoil and division? What prevents me from seeing that of God in everyone?

 

Welcome of Visitors

 

Clerk’s Report

 

  • Our Black Lives Matter banner has been replaced.

 

  • In the lead-up to the announcement about DACA, Friends brought sandwiches, snacks and water bottles to the vigilers outside the White House and helped them collect names on their petition. Now, Friends are urged to work with their Senators and Representatives, if they have any, to do everything in their power to protect 800,000 DACA-recipients from detention or deportation and push for a pathway to citizenship through the immediate and clean passage of S. 1615/H.R. 3440, the Dream Act of 2017.

 

  • Houston Friends Meeting has established a Fund for Sufferings for Friends affected by Harvey. If you would like to contribute toward hurricane relief, you may send your check to Live Oak Friends Meeting, 1318 W. 26th St., Houston, TX 77008, noting "Fund for Sufferings, hurricane relief" on the check.

 

  • First Day School is off and running. Please bring your children and their friends for this fun and meaningful time each week.

 

  • On Saturday, Sept. 16, The Vigilance Project will present an all-day symposium in our Meeting Room on “Aesthetic, Social, Political & Economic Resistance to Enslavement: The Antebellum Black Church.” They particularly wanted to hold this symposium in a Quaker meetinghouse because of the long history of Black people and Quakers working together to resist enslavement. Their website is www.vigilanceprojectdc.org

 

  • Next Sunday, Sept. 17, join a lobbying workshop with Hannah Graf Evans, Legislative Representative for Immigration at the Friends Committee on National Legislation (the Quaker lobby) to learn how individuals can provide effective messages, and transform our relationships with our federal elected officials toward just immigration policies. The workshop will resource you with the tools you need to take action on the federal level on immigration, including a current state of play in Congress and the Administration on immigration issues, and a hands-on practicum for conducting a lobby visit.

 

<>·Daniel Dozier (M)

 

William Foskett (M)

Mark Haskell (M)

Martha Solt (M)

Faith Williams (M)

 

 

Report back from Annual Sessions – David Etheridge, Debby Churchman

 

 

 

Annual Report of the Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Fund

 Friends Meeting of Washington

September 2017

 

Introduction

The Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Fund has given a total of 121 scholarships to deserving students in the District of Columbia to enable them to attend college.  All seniors in DC Public Schools can apply. The scholarship is awarded to students with

  • Major financial need;
  • Strong values and contribution to the community;
  • Good academic standing (GPA, class rank, AP classes);
  • Demonstrated drive and determination to succeed in college;
  • Demonstrated success in overcoming past obstacles.

The Friends Meeting of Washington established the program 36 years ago, and has since been joined by Bethesda Friends Meeting and Langley Hill Meeting. A committee comprising members and attenders of the three meetings jointly manages and mobilizes financing for this scholarship fund. The committee members contact public schools to raise awareness of the scholarship opportunity, select recipients, manage the funding, provide mentoring to scholars, and make decisions about the program’s policies and practices.

The scholarship award is now $6,000 per student: $1,500 per year for freshmen through senior years.  For 2017-2018, we have disbursed $2,000 to seniors rather than $1500. When we have extra funds it is our intent to give added support to those who have worked hard to get to senior year. We commit to support students through their four years of college. To maintain eligibility each year, students must submit their college transcript, proof of enrollment for the next school year, and a letter discussing the successes and challenges of the last school year.

This year we will give out a total of 18 scholarships because two of our students are stuck and may be working this year rather than attending school. Nevertheless we are trying to stay in contact with them, assuring them that when they are able to return to school, their scholarship will still be available.

The New Freshmen

 

 This June, we selected five students who demonstrated strong academic potential, inspiring community service, and significant financial need.

 

To respect their privacy, we are listing only the students’ first names in this report.

 

1. Ahmad has been a student at the Seed School. We were impressed by his strong academics with a GPA of 3.9 and 6 AP Courses. He has attended summer enrichment courses at both Duke in 2015 and Stanford in 2016. Ahmad is a self- directed learner with a particular interest in math. He figures out what he needs to know and then learns it. During the interview we discovered that his older sister is also a Mary Jane Simpson Scholar. They are both immigrants from Somalia and both will be attending Virginia Tech. Ahmad wants to major in civil engineering in part because his father had to put aside his hopes of being an engineer when the family left Somalia. Ahmad intends to do a work-study program at Virginia Tech.

2. Enjolique impressed us by how hard she is working at school and in two internships despite serious family challenges. At McKinley Technical High School, she has achieved a 3.3 GPA and took 2 AP courses. Each week this year she worked 15-20 hours at the World Bank. This summer she had an internship at Clark Construction from Monday to Friday and worked at TJ Max on Sunday and Saturday.  In her “free time” she has worked on a toy drive with Upward Bound, worked at a local food bank and cooked for people in shelters. Her teachers describe her as a student with a high level of commitment to her community. Enjolique will be attending North Carolina A & T. Enjolique has had a challenging family life. She is one of six children who was raised by her older sister after the parents left or could not care for their children. She wants a career in business or fashion. When asked what she does for fun, she looked somewhat perplexed.

 

3. Hao is an immigrant from China who attended School Without Walls. We were impressed by his energy and drive. He translates at the Chinese Cultural Center and has helped his parents run their business. He realizes that he will need to continue helping his parents when he goes to college. Hao also works as a busboy at Chinese restaurants and he has been active in a film production club and photography club. Hao has been fortunate to have a teacher who has been an inspiration for him. This art teacher worked for 8 years to get his college degree and has gone on to get two masters degree. Hao feels that if he can do this, Hao can too. Hao will be attending George Mason and will do a work study program.

 

4. Olivia has been a student at Duke Ellington where she carried a full academic load and after 2 pm took a full program of acting classes. Despite her heavy load she has maintained a GPA of 3.3 and taken 2 AP courses. For several years she has had two jobs, at 21st Century Fox and Friends of the National Zoo. She also was a student intern at The Washington Post.  In 2015 she attended the British American Drama Academy Midsummer Conservatory Program at Wadham College in Oxford. In the summer of 2016 she studied French language immersion in Senegal. She is very interested in women’s empowerment. She wants to use film to “expose the ugly truths hidden throughout the world” and “lessen mass ignorance.” She will attend Noropa College for one year and then go to Hawaiian Pacific University.

 

5. Tyrese graduated from Cesar Chavez Public Charter School with a 3.3 GPA. He has been living on the streets and in shelters with his mother ever since they were evicted from their apartment. During this difficult period when his mother lost her job, they were forced to use up all the family savings which makes him very vulnerable as he heads off to college. Tyrese says of himself, “I am not just a survivor, I am an overcomer.” Tyrese powered on regardless of his circumstances and did well academically. He has been a mentor to the children in his neighborhood, worked on the Brady campaign, was on student government and played varsity soccer. His 12th grade thesis was entitled, “Police Brutality in African American Communities in DC, MD and VA.” He will attend Ithaca College where he wants to major in physical therapy.

 

 

 

Mentoring for Students

Now in addition to giving each student a mentor from our committee, each student has an older student as mentor. This is our second year and we will see how it goes. The students all seem to enjoy our tea in early July.

Summary Data

MJS 2017 Applications by School

 

 

Schools in Alphabetical Order

School

Applications

2017 Scholars

Anacostia H.S.

1

 

Ballou

0

 

Banneker

6

 

BASIS PCS

0

 

Calvin Coolidge H.S.

0

 

Capital City PCS

4

 

Cardozo H. S.

3

 

Chavez - Capitol Hill

2

 

Chavez - Parkside

3

1

Columbia Heights Ed Campus

3

 

Duke Ellington

5

1

Dunbar

0

 

E. L. Haynes PCS

2

 

Eastern Senior H. S.

0

 

Friendship Collegiate Academy

1

 

Friendship Tech Prep

1

 

IDEA PCS

3

 

Kingsman Academy

0

 

KIPP DC College Prep

13

 

Luke C. Moore

0

 

Maya Angelou PCS Evans H. S.

0

 

McKinley Tech

20

1

National Collegiate Prep

0

 

Paul International

0

 

Perry Street Prep Academy PCS

0

 

Phelps ACE High School

5

 

Richard Wright PCS

0

 

Roosevelt H. S.

2

 

School W/O Walls

2

1

SEED PCS

6

1

Thurgood Marshall Academy

1

 

Washington Latin

3

 

Washington Math, Science Tech

4

 

Washington Metropolitan H. S.

0

 

Woodrow Wilson

2

 

Woodson

3

 

Total

95

 

 

Schools by Number of Applications

School

Applications

2017 Scholars

McKinley Tech

20

1

KIPP DC College Prep

13

 

Banneker

6

 

SEED PCS

6

1

Duke Ellington

5

1

Phelps ACE High School

5

 

Capital City PCS

4

 

Washington Math, Science Tech

4

 

Cardozo H. S.

3

 

Chavez - Parkside

3

1

Columbia Heights Ed Campus

3

 

IDEA PCS

3

 

Washington Latin

3

 

Woodson

3

 

Chavez - Capitol Hill

2

 

E. L. Haynes PCS

2

 

Roosevelt H. S.

2

 

School W/O Walls

2

1

Woodrow Wilson

2

 

Anacostia H.S.

1

 

Friendship Collegiate Academy

1

 

Friendship Tech Prep

1

 

Thurgood Marshall Academy

1

 

Ballou

0

 

BASIS PCS

0

 

Calvin Coolidge H.S.

0

 

Dunbar

0

 

Eastern Senior H. S.

0

 

Kingsman Academy

0

 

Luke C. Moore

0

 

Maya Angelou PCS Evans H. S.

0

 

National Collegiate Prep

0

 

Paul International

0

 

Perry Street Prep Academy PCS

0

 

Richard Wright PCS

0

 

Washington Metropolitan H. S.

0

 

 

 

 

 

Name[1]

University

Status

Mercedes

Xavier University

Graduated in 2015, in 5 years.

Started Xavier School of Pharmacology in 2015. (Finished 2nd year in spring 2017)

Yolande

Trinity Washington University

Graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN) in 2015.  She passed the NCLEX board exam and is now a Registered Nurse.  Had a baby girl (Promise) in early August 2016. (Lives with her fiancé and mother.)

Nosa

Hampton College

Graduated from Hampton in spring 2014.  He is an entrepreneur in the fashion field (started this in college).  He custom designs and produces items for individuals and organizations and has a luxury clothing line.

Vincent

Temple University

Graduated in May 2014 with Bachelors in Kinesiology. Works full time as Gym Supervisor at Fortaleza Fitness Center in Philadelphia. and part time as a group exercise instructor.

Jeanifer

Rutgers University

Graduated in May 2014 with 3.5 GPA. From June 2014 to present, Research Coordinator at Memorial Sloan Kettering, Dept of Immunotherapy (Trials).  Starting 2017, entered MSc Program in Health Policy and Economics at Cornell University.  From 2014-Present, President/Founder of Partners for a Health Africa, 501c3, helping poor communities in Nigeria and US to deal with malaria and vision impairment.  [Mentor to Enjolique]

Marcus

Clemson University

Graduated in August 2017.  Finished classes in December 2016 and did coop engineering internship with International Paper from January to July, 2017.  As of August 14, 2017 he is a full time packaging engineer for Smithfield Foods, located at the corporate office in Smithfield VA.  His work includes 60% travel to 8 plants in North Carolina and Mid-West, responding to problems in packaging and working with vendors to develop and integrate better packaging for products.

Jeannette

UDC community college, then Latin America Youth Center

 Became a Certified Medical Assistant in August, 2015, from the Latin American Youth Center. At first, Jeannette was working as an administrative CMA.  Since March 2016, she has been working as a clinical Certified Medical Assistant for a primary care physician at the A+ Medical Clinic in Hyattsville. She also intends to get further certifications in specialized areas (e.g., phlebotomy).

DeAnjilo

Pepperdine University

Graduated in May 2015. Now a producer/editor for the National Football League Networks and a production assistant at Fox Sports West.

Hezouwe Happy

George Washington University

Graduated in May 2016.  In Peace Corps in Benin for next two years. [Interim student mentor to Marie before leaving.]  On return she plans to apply to graduate or medical school specializing in public health.

Cori

Ohio State University

Graduated in May 2017 with a B.A in Psychology and minor in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Currently Cori working with Ohio State Police Department in a junior officer position. She will be applying to be a police officer in December 2017.  Then she hopes transfer to the George Washington University Police division. While working she plans to earn her Masters in Forensic Psychology. 

Rainer

UDC

Graduated in May 2016, majored in civil engineering with a specialty in concrete structures.  In early summer 2016 he married and moved to California. His plans of getting a job and applying to U. California San Jose for a Masters degree in structural engineering have been deferred by the current crisis facing the immigrant community in the US.  He is applying for a waiver to allow him to work.  He will move to Boston in September 2017.

Raven

Bennett College for Women

Graduated in May 2017. She majored in social work and plans to go directly into a masters program in social work after college.

Sherve’

Oglethorpe University

Rising senior, scheduled to graduate in spring, 2017.

Kasey

Loyola University in New Orleans

Difficulties. May not complete.

Chanel

Temple University

Rising senior in five-year program, scheduled to graduate in spring, 2018, with BS in Civil Engineering and Certificate from Fox School of Business.  Had strong junior year. Active in Temple and regional chapters of National Society of Black Engineers. Spent summer of 2016 on internship and summer of 2017 interning with an engineering firm in Philadelphia.  [Mentor to Bakari]

Nijah

Virginia Tech

Rising Senior in five-year program, scheduled to graduate in spring, 2018. Spent summer of 2016 in California on internship. [Mentor to Ahmad.]

Rajanique

Furman University

Graduated in spring, 2017.

Ana

Trinity, transferred to UDC

Not full-time, hence no MJS funding since 2014-15 (her freshman year).

Diana

Emory University

Rising Senior in 2017-18.  Got into Emory Business School in 2016. [Mentor to Dayasia]

 

 

Samantha

University of Wisconsin

Took 2016-spring term off, mid-sophomore year.  In fall 2016, she planned to go to community college in Madison with transferability of credits to U. Wisc.  No response from her; we suspect she is not in school.

Nadiyah

Temple University

Rising Senior.  [Mentor to Marie.]

Teasha

University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Rising Senior (scheduled to graduate spring, 2018).

Betel

Howard University

Rising Junior (scheduled to graduate spring, 2019). [Mentor to Alexis.]

Braswell

University of Arizona

Rising Junior (scheduled to graduate spring, 2019).

Jenifer

UDC

Rising Junior – on Dean’s list in first two years, all A’s in sophomore year, majoring in Biology.

Maryam

Virginia Tech

Rising Junior, scheduled to graduate spring, 2019. [Mentor to Tyrese White.]

Daniel

North Carolina Central, Durham

Rising Junior

Dayasia

Univ. of California at Santa Cruz

Rising Sophomore

Marie-Helene (Marie)

George Washington University

Rising Sophomore

Alexis

George Mason University

Rising Sophomore

Merhawi

University of Virginia

Rising Sophomore

Bakari

Howard University (transferred from Morehouse College between freshman and sophomore years)

Rising Sophomore

Enjolique

North Carolina A&T University

 

Entering Freshman

Ahmad

Virginia Tech

 

Entering Freshman

Tyrese

Ithaca College

 

Entering Freshman

Olivia

Naropa Univ. (LEAP year for credit); planning to enter Univ of Hawaii at Manoa in fall 2018

Entering Freshman

Hao

George Mason Univ.

Entering Freshman

 

 

 

Resources and Commitments

 

Table 1. Resources Mobilized in 2016-17: Sources

 

US $

Bethesda Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation (Peace & Social Justice Committee)

4,000

Social Concerns Box + Contributions from Individuals in Meeting

14,256

BFM Total

18,256

Friends Meeting of Washington

 

Meeting Allocation

5,000

FMW Individuals and Fund-raising

12,859

FMW Total

17,859

Langley Hill Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation

300

           Individuals

996

           Langley Hill Total

1,296

 Total Contributions

37,411

 

 

 

 

Table 2. Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Resources,

Commitments, and Net Reserve

Resources

 

Fund Balance 6/30/20161

99,616

Funding Mobilized in 2016-172

37,411

Remittances in 2016-2017

  (29,144)

Ending Balance 6/30/20173

107,883

 

 

Commitments  (assuming $2,000 for current seniors only)

 

3 Seniors @ $2,000

(6,000.00)

5 Juniors @ $1,500+$1,500

(15,000.00)

5 Sophomores @$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(22,500.00)

5 Freshmen @ $1,500+$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(30,000.00)

Total Commitments

(73,500.00)

 

 

Net Reserve

34,383

 

 

 

 

­­­­­­­____________________________

 

1 Includes $3,000 of BFM FY16 contributions that were transferred to FMW in early FY17.

2 Includes $426 transferred to FMW from Langley Hill Meeting in July, 2017, that was mobilized from fund-raising concert in June 2017, and $474 soon to be transferred to FMW from BFM FY17 fund-raising.

3. Ibid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FMW Property Committee

Annual Report

September 2017

 

This report covers the period from April 2016 (the date of our last annual report) through July 2017.

 

Major projects completed and charged to the Property or Capital Reserve Fund include:

 

  • 2nd floor restroom, Carriage House
     
  • “Temporary” restroom, Carriage House
     
  • Corrected water penetration problem into Decatur Place Room (DPR)
     
  • Renovated DPR (including mold abatement / repair of water damage, addition of closets for storage of nursery equipment and furniture, upgrade of electric service, replacement of flooring, and deep cleaning of existing rug)
     
  • Renovated the Administrative Secretary / Event Manager’s office to make her work environment more pleasant as well as to create a welcoming environment for the many visitors / event rental customers she receives.

 

The committee has reviewed furnishing needs for our campus and has begun implementing a plan to upgrade furnishings in various meeting spaces. We have:

 

  • Reupholstered sofas in the Parlor
     
  • Ordered chairs for DPR and Quaker House Living Room (QHLR), an upgrade of our mismatched folding chairs
     
  • Determined what we want in the DPR and North Room and have begun looking for suitable pieces

 

We have continued our focus on making the campus more environmentally friendly and inclusive to all. We have:

 

  • Implemented a composting program through a contract with Veteran Composting.  Each week, the company picks up our green compost bin in the kitchen and leaves behind a fresh one.

 

  • Identified a plan for solar panel installation on the west slope of the Meeting House roof.

 

  • Agreed to move forward with the purchase of electricity generated using wind power for the balance of our campus electricity usage.

 

  • Installed gender-neutral restroom signs throughout campus to make our buildings more welcoming to transgender individuals and to those of all gender identities.

 

  • Reviewed a set of recommendations received from a Friend concerned about the accessibility of our campus and we are in the process of implementing many of them.

 

Working with the Capital Improvement Task Force, we are developing plans to upgrade and expand the Assembly Room, both for our own use and as event space.  In-house staff has improved window wells for efficiency and appearance. 

 

The committee also looks ahead to identify repairs and improvements that may be required in the next few years.  These include:

 

  • Replacement of Meeting room HVAC
     
  • Replacement of Meeting house roof (a portion of which will be done in the near future if the Meeting approves the installation of solar panels)
     
  • Refinish floor in QHLR
     
  • Correct roof leak in QHLR and repaint

 

Longer term projects include:
 

  • Expansion/replacement of 2nd floor QH kitchen
     
  • Removal of steep western stairwell in QH, which does not does not meet code and will not be needed post-renovation
     
  • Addition of fire suppression as spaces become vacant in QH and CH
     
  • Address auditory issues in Meeting Room

 

We continue to work closely with other Meeting committees in an attempt to meet the Meeting's multiple needs while being sensitive to budget constraints and the special demands of the probable renovation project. We are exploring with the city the installation of a crosswalk at the intersection of Florida Avenue and Decatur Place, as well as designated handicapped parking near the new elevator entrance.

 

We coordinate and help to plan and report event rental activity, including fees and the implementation of the relaxation of the alcohol policy.

 

The committee wishes to acknowledge the overwhelming contributions of Ken Orvis, Property Manager, and Debby Churchman, Administrative Secretary and Events Manager, without whom we could not function. 

 

Respectfully submitted,

Brian Lutenegger, Merry Pearlstein (Co-clerks), Jay Harris, Justin Kwong, Alex Mathews, Ken Orvis, David Miller 

 

 

Hospitality Committee Annual Report

September 2017

 

Hospitality Committee welcomes our Meeting members, attenders, and guests at the rise of Worship each First Day. We provide coffee and tea service, water and lemonade, serve the bounty provided by our community and do a spectacular cleanup.

Kate Steger, co-clerk, and Margo Greenlee coordinate Souper Sunday, recruiting soup chefs and bakers to ensure that those who attend Meeting for Business do so with adequate sustenance.

The lists below reflects who sets-up, greets, serves, and cleans-up, some of whom are members of the committee, some of whom are currently active on the committee but not listed, and some are listed but inactive.

 

Active

  • Greyson Aquiavia – as schedule allows
  • Pam Callard                                  
  • Leonard Eoussa                         
  • Kathy Lipp Farr
  • Margo Greenlee
  • Susan Griffin
  • Sarah Radomsky
  • Kate Steger

 

Inactive

  • Malachy Kilbride – not reporting
  • Tom Libbert – retired after stellar service
  • Greg Robb – now clerk of Ministry and Worship, pitching in as needed
  • Jorge Sanchez – reassigned to Dad Duty

 

 

 

In a category all of their own:

 

In addition, two of our Clerks Emeriti, Bill Strein, and Alex Matthews, volunteer with the committee regularly.Alex Matthews, compost czar, also launders dishtowels and tablecloths.Bill Strein serves every third Sunday and has mentored Susan from the beginning of her tenure on the committee.As Bill approaches a decade of Hospitality Committee Service and takes on other significant responsibilities for the Meeting, he is planning to lay down KP.

 

Patty Murphy is an experienced kitchen-hand who responds readily to the committee’s entreaties for help and will often just poke her head in kitchen and see if we look bedraggled.

 

Bruce Kellogg and GT Hunt make sure that the early arrivals have coffee and cookies.

 

We continue to enjoy the once-monthly presence of First Day School Students who prepare cookies, cakes, or cupcakes to celebrate birthdays of FMW community members.Michael Beer and the Religious Education Committee offer the Family Brunch the first Sunday of the month, an event that nurtures and strengthens that essential part of our community.

 

In addition to regularly scheduled Sunday duties, the hospitality committee would like to organize quarterly kitchen cleaning days, but time and capacity have made this challenging. Hospitality "floaters" or back-stoppers would be very helpful. 

 

We strive to make the FMW kitchen a conflict-free zone. To that end, we plan to create a Friendly Handout on Food Contributions to guide members and attenders on leaving food and other items in the kitchen for community use. We'll share the handout with the Committee of Clerks when ready and keep a laminated copy in the kitchen. We hope this will help keep the refrigerator clean, the cupboards uncluttered, and the food we serve safe and sanitary. We also do this with the intention of respecting the limitations of a stretched committee. While hospitality is a valuable and important aspect of our community, simplicity is also a Quaker testimony we can rely on to guide us towards harmony and good cheer in the kitchen. 

 

Lastly, we expect that the proposed construction will impact hospitality and we welcome advanced discussion with other committees on what we should expect and how we might mitigate disruption while maintaining some modified hospitality. 

 

As indicated above, we need and would very much appreciate additional help. Like everyone in our Meeting, we are called to responsibilities and travel that take us away from Sunday service. This means that members and supporters of the committee may work alone on Sunday or work more than one Sunday a month.This is not optimal.

 

In order to be adequately staffed, we require two or three additional people who are available to be called upon to serve on an as-needed basis.This would ensure that there are 4-hands available for every First Day.Please consider joining our ministry of welcoming and community.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Susan Griffin & Kate Steger, Co-Clerks

 

[1] To respect students’ privacy, their last names and con

 

 

 

tact inf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources and Commitments

 

Table 1. Resources Mobilized in 2016-17: Sources

 

US $

Bethesda Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation (Peace & Social Justice Committee)

4,000

Social Concerns Box + Contributions from Individuals in Meeting

14,256

BFM Total

18,256

Friends Meeting of Washington

 

Meeting Allocation

5,000

FMW Individuals and Fund-raising

12,859

FMW Total

17,859

Langley Hill Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation

300

           Individuals

996

           Langley Hill Total

1,296

 Total Contributions

37,411

 

 

 

 

Table 2. Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Resources,

Commitments, and Net Reserve

Resources

 

Fund Balance 6/30/20161

99,616

Funding Mobilized in 2016-172

37,411

Remittances in 2016-2017

  (29,144)

Ending Balance 6/30/20173

107,883

 

 

Commitments  (assuming $2,000 for current seniors only)

 

3 Seniors @ $2,000

(6,000.00)

5 Juniors @ $1,500+$1,500

(15,000.00)

5 Sophomores @$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(22,500.00)

5 Freshmen @ $1,500+$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(30,000.00)

Total Commitments

(73,500.00)

 

 

Net Reserve

34,383

 

 

 

 

­­­­­­­____________________________

 

1 Includes $3,000 of BFM FY16 contributions that were transferred to FMW in early FY17.

2 Includes $426 transferred to FMW from Langley Hill Meeting in July, 2017, that was mobilized from fund-raising concert in June 2017, and $474 soon to be transferred to FMW from BFM FY17 fund-raising.

3. Ibid

 

 

FMW Property Committee

Annual Report

September 2017

 

This report covers the period from April 2016 (the date of our last annual report) through July 2017.

 

Major projects completed and charged to the Property or Capital Reserve Fund include:

 

  • 2nd floor restroom, Carriage House
     
  • “Temporary” restroom, Carriage House
     
  • Corrected water penetration problem into Decatur Place Room (DPR)
     
  • Renovated DPR (including mold abatement / repair of water damage, addition of closets for storage of nursery equipment and furniture, upgrade of electric service, replacement of flooring, and deep cleaning of existing rug)
     
  • Renovated the Administrative Secretary / Event Manager’s office to make her work environment more pleasant as well as to create a welcoming environment for the many visitors / event rental customers she receives.

 

The committee has reviewed furnishing needs for our campus and has begun implementing a plan to upgrade furnishings in various meeting spaces. We have:

 

  • Reupholstered sofas in the Parlor
     
  • Ordered chairs for DPR and Quaker House Living Room (QHLR), an upgrade of our mismatched folding chairs
     
  • Determined what we want in the DPR and North Room and have begun looking for suitable pieces

 

We have continued our focus on making the campus more environmentally friendly and inclusive to all. We have:

 

  • Implemented a composting program through a contract with Veteran Composting.  Each week, the company picks up our green compost bin in the kitchen and leaves behind a fresh one.

 

  • Identified a plan for solar panel installation on the west slope of the Meeting House roof.

 

  • Agreed to move forward with the purchase of electricity generated using wind power for the balance of our campus electricity usage.

 

  • Installed gender-neutral restroom signs throughout campus to make our buildings more welcoming to transgender individuals and to those of all gender identities.

 

  • Reviewed a set of recommendations received from a Friend concerned about the accessibility of our campus and we are in the process of implementing many of them.

 

Working with the Capital Improvement Task Force, we are developing plans to upgrade and expand the Assembly Room, both for our own use and as event space.  In-house staff has improved window wells for efficiency and appearance. 

 

The committee also looks ahead to identify repairs and improvements that may be required in the next few years.  These include:

 

  • Replacement of Meeting room HVAC
     
  • Replacement of Meeting house roof (a portion of which will be done in the near future if the Meeting approves the installation of solar panels)
     
  • Refinish floor in QHLR
     
  • Correct roof leak in QHLR and repaint

 

Longer term projects include:
 

  • Expansion/replacement of 2nd floor QH kitchen
     
  • Removal of steep western stairwell in QH, which does not does not meet code and will not be needed post-renovation
     
  • Addition of fire suppression as spaces become vacant in QH and CH
     
  • Address auditory issues in Meeting Room

 

We continue to work closely with other Meeting committees in an attempt to meet the Meeting's multiple needs while being sensitive to budget constraints and the special demands of the probable renovation project. We are exploring with the city the installation of a crosswalk at the intersection of Florida Avenue and Decatur Place, as well as designated handicapped parking near the new elevator entrance.

 

We coordinate and help to plan and report event rental activity, including fees and the implementation of the relaxation of the alcohol policy.

 

The committee wishes to acknowledge the overwhelming contributions of Ken Orvis, Property Manager, and Debby Churchman, Administrative Secretary and Events Manager, without whom we could not function. 

 

Respectfully submitted,

Brian Lutenegger, Merry Pearlstein (Co-clerks), Jay Harris, Justin Kwong, Alex Mathews, Ken Orvis, David Miller 

 

 

Hospitality Committee Annual Report

September 2017

 

Hospitality Committee welcomes our Meeting members, attenders, and guests at the rise of Worship each First Day. We provide coffee and tea service, water and lemonade, serve the bounty provided by our community and do a spectacular cleanup.

Kate Steger, co-clerk, and Margo Greenlee coordinate Souper Sunday, recruiting soup chefs and bakers to ensure that those who attend Meeting for Business do so with adequate sustenance.

The lists below reflects who sets-up, greets, serves, and cleans-up, some of whom are members of the committee, some of whom are currently active on the committee but not listed, and some are listed but inactive.

 

Active

  • Greyson Aquiavia – as schedule allows
  • Pam Callard                                  
  • Leonard Eoussa                         
  • Kathy Lipp Farr
  • Margo Greenlee
  • Susan Griffin
  • Sarah Radomsky
  • Kate Steger

 

Inactive

  • Malachy Kilbride – not reporting
  • Tom Libbert – retired after stellar service
  • Greg Robb – now clerk of Ministry and Worship, pitching in as needed
  • Jorge Sanchez – reassigned to Dad Duty

 

 

 

In a category all of their own:

 

In addition, two of our Clerks Emeriti, Bill Strein, and Alex Matthews, volunteer with the committee regularly.Alex Matthews, compost czar, also launders dishtowels and tablecloths.Bill Strein serves every third Sunday and has mentored Susan from the beginning of her tenure on the committee.As Bill approaches a decade of Hospitality Committee Service and takes on other significant responsibilities for the Meeting, he is planning to lay down KP.

 

Patty Murphy is an experienced kitchen-hand who responds readily to the committee’s entreaties for help and will often just poke her head in kitchen and see if we look bedraggled.

 

Bruce Kellogg and GT Hunt make sure that the early arrivals have coffee and cookies.

 

We continue to enjoy the once-monthly presence of First Day School Students who prepare cookies, cakes, or cupcakes to celebrate birthdays of FMW community members.Michael Beer and the Religious Education Committee offer the Family Brunch the first Sunday of the month, an event that nurtures and strengthens that essential part of our community.

 

In addition to regularly scheduled Sunday duties, the hospitality committee would like to organize quarterly kitchen cleaning days, but time and capacity have made this challenging. Hospitality "floaters" or back-stoppers would be very helpful. 

 

We strive to make the FMW kitchen a conflict-free zone. To that end, we plan to create a Friendly Handout on Food Contributions to guide members and attenders on leaving food and other items in the kitchen for community use. We'll share the handout with the Committee of Clerks when ready and keep a laminated copy in the kitchen. We hope this will help keep the refrigerator clean, the cupboards uncluttered, and the food we serve safe and sanitary. We also do this with the intention of respecting the limitations of a stretched committee. While hospitality is a valuable and important aspect of our community, simplicity is also a Quaker testimony we can rely on to guide us towards harmony and good cheer in the kitchen. 

 

Lastly, we expect that the proposed construction will impact hospitality and we welcome advanced discussion with other committees on what we should expect and how we might mitigate disruption while maintaining some modified hospitality. 

 

As indicated above, we need and would very much appreciate additional help. Like everyone in our Meeting, we are called to responsibilities and travel that take us away from Sunday service. This means that members and supporters of the committee may work alone on Sunday or work more than one Sunday a month.This is not optimal.

 

In order to be adequately staffed, we require two or three additional people who are available to be called upon to serve on an as-needed basis.This would ensure that there are 4-hands available for every First Day.Please consider joining our ministry of welcoming and community.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Susan Griffin & Kate Steger, Co-Clerks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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